Tag: Suddenly Single

Single Women and Investing

Women are in charge of more than half of the investable assets in this country.  A recent Business Insider article claims that women now control 51% of U.S. wealth worth $14 trillion, a number that’s expected to grow to $22 trillion by 2020.

Single women, whether divorced, widowed, or never married, have been a significant part of our clientele since our founding.  Widows that come to us appreciate that we listen and take time to educate them, especially if their spouses managed the family finances.  Once their initial concerns are alleviated they’re often terrific investors because they are able to take a long-term view and don’t let short-term issues rattle them very much.

Unfortunately, we have had women complain to us that other advisors that they’ve had in the past did not want to discuss the details of their investments and the strategy employed. Other women have come to us with portfolios that were devastated by inadequate diversification.

Our female clients are intelligent adults who hire us to do our best for them so that they can focus on the things that are important to them.  We are always happy to get into as much detail on their portfolios as they require.  Our focus on education, communication, diversification and risk control has led to a large and growing core of women investors, many of whom have been with us for decades.

Our book, BEFORE I GO, and the accompanying BEFORE I GO WORKBOOK, is a must-have for women who are with a spouse that handles the family finances.  Men who have always handled the family finances should also grab a copy and fill out the workbook.  If something were to happen to them, it would be a tremendous relief to their spouse to have such a resource when taking over the financial duties. 

If you were widowed, would you fire your husband’s financial advisor?

According to an article in Financial Advisor magazine,

Surviving spouses — statistically, wives — have a habit of firing financial advisors. Most sources peg the rate at about 50%, but the advisor-education website says the rate is closer to 70% if you wait a few years for the penny to drop.

Why is that?  It seems that most advisors have an “unbalanced advisor-client relationship.”  That means the advisor focuses on the half of the couple that seems to be more financially savvy.  This results in the surviving spouse, often the wife, not really thinking that the advisor is “her” advisor.

The article goes on to suggest that the advisor “provide basic, nuts-and-bolts financial advice to the surviving spouse.”

At Korving & Co. we go one better.  We have written a set of books “Before I Go” and the “Before I Go Workbook” anticipating the issues that the surviving spouse will face.

That’s why when our clients lose a spouse, we rarely lose the survivor.  They know that we focus on the family and the surviving widow trust us to take care of her.  In fact, we often find that when both husband and wife have passed on, the children come to us to manage their affairs.

For a personally autographed copy of both books, or more information on how we can help you, contact us.

What Each Spouse Should Know About Finances

A recent Wall Street Journal article discusses the division of labor in families.

In the typical division of labor in many households, one spouse manages the bills and the assets.  This is natural and healthy, financial planners say.  But both spouses should have at least a baseline understanding of the family finances, the experts add—and this seldom seems to be the case.
Just 28{030251e622a83165372097b752b1e1477acc3e16319689a4bdeb1497eb0fac93} of couples were “completely confident” that either spouse alone was prepared to steer their joint retirement finances, according to a recent study by Fidelity Investments.

Disability, divorce or death can thrust new responsibilities on spouses when they are ill-prepared. But talking about such “what ifs” can stir up uncomfortable questions and issues, so many couples avoid doing so.
“There’s a tendency to say, ‘Tomorrow, tomorrow, tomorrow,’ ” says Dorian Mintzer, a retirement-transition coach, speaker and author. Most couples “want to avoid confrontation and don’t want to think about their own mortality,” she says, even though “talking about it can free you up and help you try to plan what’s ahead.”

I was actually happy to see the article because I completely agree with this analysis.  This is exactly the reason we published the book BEFORE I GO.  Get a copy for yourself or someone you love.  If you are a couple like the one described in the WSJ article, create a relationship with an RIA who can help the spouse who is less prepared and can help the survivor cope.

© 2021 Korving & Company, LLC